September 14

GRADE PREP/1/2 WEEK 10 TERM 3 REMOTE LEARNING 2020

GRADE PREP/1/2 WEEK 10 TERM 3 REMOTE LEARNING 2020

I hope you all enjoy the fantastic activities in the SUPER DOOPER SPECIALIST GRID for Week 10 – especially the Visual Arts activities! The grid can be found on the Cambridge Primary school website.

Congratulations on surviving one whole term of remote learning at home.

Congratulations

Let’s hope we all see each other at school, in the art room, next term!

Have fun,

from Mrs Menhennet

August 19

GRADE 2 WEEK 7 TERM 3 REMOTE LEARNING 2020

 

GRADE 2 WEEK 7 TERM 3

REMOTE LEARNING 2020

24th August 2020 – 28th August 2020

READ ALONG WITH MRS MENHENNET!

 

This is week 7 of Term 3 2020 and all my Grade 2  students are remote learning at home!

 

This week we are going to be doing some Visual Arts learning about PAPER WEAVING.

OVER UNDER OVER UNDER

I have a few videos for you to watch about paper weaving.

OVER UNDER OVER UNDER

This first video has been made by a teacher called Mr Wedge.

OVER UNDER OVER UNDER

Here is a link to Mr Wedge’s youtube channel in case you want to watch any more of his art teacher videos.

OVER UNDER OVER UNDER

In the video above Mr Wedge folds and cuts his paper without drawing or ruling any lines on it.

OVER UNDER OVER UNDER

If you would prefer to cut along some printed lines I have made a paper weaving loom template for you.

 

You will need to copy and print the template to use it.

OVER UNDER OVER UNDER

You don’t have to print the template. I have provided it for you if you feel you want to use it but you don’t have to.

OVER UNDER OVER UNDER

You can use whatever paper you have at home. If we were working in the art room I would give you coloured cover paper to use, like Mr Wedge has used in his video, as it is a little bit stronger than photocopy paper.

OVER UNDER OVER UNDER

Remember this is PAPER weaving and PAPER tears very easily.

OVER UNDER OVER UNDER

But, like I said,  you can use whatever paper you have at home.

OVER UNDER OVER UNDER

The front cover of an old magazine would make a terrific paper weaving loom as it would be much stronger than photocopy paper. It would also make an interesting piece of weaving because the loom itself would be multicoloured.

OVER UNDER OVER UNDER

The side of an empty cereal box would also make a strong weaving loom as it would be made of thin cardboard.

 

OVER UNDER OVER UNDER

You also need to cut some long strips of paper to weave with.

OVER UNDER OVER UNDER

They need to be as long as the weaving loom is wide. If they are longer and hang out the sides that doesn’t matter. They can be trimmed off later. If they are too short and don’t reach all the way across the weaving loom, your weaving will have gaps in it!

OVER UNDER OVER UNDER

Again, it doesn’t really matter what type of paper that you use for your weaving strips but coloured or patterned paper will make your weaving look more interesting. Just make sure the strips are long enough to go right across your weaving loom.

OVER UNDER OVER UNDER

Here is a video of me working in the art room at Cambridge Primary School with some grade 2 students teaching them how to do paper weaving. They are using a different paper template to the template I have put on this blog but that doesn’t matter. The way you weave is still the same.

OVER UNDER OVER UNDER

OVER UNDER OVER UNDER

 The paper weaving video 2 and 3 show you how to finish off your paper weaving with a glue stick. There are 2 videos on how to finish as the filming was interrupted by students knocking on the classroom door as a student was filming me on my Ipad!

OVER UNDER OVER UNDER

So, now you have watched these videos I would love for you to have a go at doing some paper weaving.

I will make a folder on Edmodo for you to upload your paper weaving so I can look at it.

Your Specialists Rich Task was due at the end of last week. If you need the instructions for the Rich Task you can find them on the Week 5 blog post. If you can’t find the Week 5 blog post there is a link to it in the sidebar of the blog in the section called Recent Blog Posts.

 

 You also need to ensure you have submitted any other work for your  Specialist teachers that is evidence of your participation in remote learning, into the correct place.

If you enjoyed the videos or want to tell me anything else you can always post a comment at the end of this blog post.

If you don’t know how to post a comment I gave you instructions on how to do this on the week 5 blog post.

Have fun,

from Mrs Menhennet

HERE IS THE GRADE 2 PAPER WEAVING!

 

Lena 2D paper weaving 2020

Lena 2D paper weaving 2020

Isalai 2 E paper weaving 2020

Stella 2D paper weaving 2020

Ruhi 2D paper weaving 2020

Luke 2D paper weaving 2020

Krishika 2E paper weaving 2020

Rithvik 2E paper weaving 2020

Izabella 2D paper weaving 2020

Sidharth 2d paper weaving 2020

Alyxa 2E paper weaving 2020

Sophia 2D paper weaving 2020

Emily 2D paper weaving 2020

Shaurya 2e paper weaving 2020

Alyxa 2E paper weaving 2020

August 5

GRADE 2 WEEK 5 TERM 3 REMOTE LEARNING 2020

 

GRADE 2 WEEK 5 TERM 3

REMOTE LEARNING 2020

10th August 2020 – 14th August 2020

READ ALONG WITH MRS MENHENNET!

Hello to all my Grade 2 students from Cambridge Primary School and whoever else might be reading this post.

 

This is week 5 of Term 3 2020 and all my Grade 2 students are remote learning at home!

We are going to be doing a bit of Visual Arts learning about the English artist David Hockney and his paintings of water and swimming pools!

  • For students to explore the artworks of English artist David Hockney.

  • .To revise the instructions for the Specialist Rich Task.

  • To read along with Mrs Menhennet as she reads the blog post aloud.

  • For students to learn how to write a comment on my blog.

 

  • I can view and think about the artworks of David Hockney by watching 2 short videos.

  • I understand the instructions for the Specialist Rich Task.

  • I can play the audio function  on the blog post and read along with Mrs Menhennet.

  • I can write a comment and post it on The Back art Room Blog.

Let’s get started!

In Week 2 I asked you to draw yourself swimming in water.

Grade 3 David Hockney style swimmer painting drawing 64

In week 3 I asked you to draw yourself swimming in water again but I wanted you to try to improve on your drawing from week 2.

 

Grade 3 David Hockney style swimmer painting drawing 42

There is a folder  for Week 2 and Week 3 on your grade’s Edmodo page for you to upload photos of your drawings  These photos are evidence that you have completed this work.

Here are the  Instructions for the Specialists Rich Task.

If you have already completed your Specialists Rich Task you can skip this bit. On the audio file you can press the fast forward button.

This Rich Task will require some thinking and some organising. You will need lots of time to complete it. So the Grade 2 Rich Task should be uploaded to your grade’s Edmodo folder by the end of WEEK 6!

For this Specialists Rich Task you will  –

CREATE YOURSELF SWIMMING IN WATER.

  • How does the water and the motion of swimming affect your body?

  • How does the water and motion of swimming affect your hair?

  • How will you create the water?

  • Label the body parts of yourself in Italian and English.

  • Find out what the word for water is in Italian.

  • Use digital technologies to enhance your work. You might use a creative app or take photos of your rich task as you create it or make a video explaining how you created your rich task, etc, etc.

  • What will you use to create this artwork?

For the last two weeks you might have used pencils or crayons or textas to PRACTICE drawing yourself swimming in water.

Now, in creating this Rich Task, you need to think about what else you might use to create yourself swimming in water.

thinking emoji

In the past, in the art room, my students have created themselves swimming in water like this.

Grade 3 David Hockney style swimmer painting drawing

Grade 3 David Hockney style swimmer painting drawing 1This artwork involved  –

  • Using colourful oil pastels to create their body swimming in water. Don’t forget your bathers!

  • Drawing their swimming body nice and large to fill the space on the paper. (If I wanted you to draw your swimming body really, really small I would tell you to create your art work on a tiny post it note!) DRAW BIG!

  • Using white oil pastel to draw wiggly lines in the water.

  • Using a blue wash of paint (blue paint or blue food dye with water in it) to paint over the white wiggly oil pastel lines.

  • Drawing or painting water is a challenge. The water is always moving. There are reflections in the water. The water moves and distorts the image of whatever is under the water. The water moves and distorts the image it is reflecting.

In this time of remote learning, as artists,  we are not working in the art room.

In this time of remote learning, as artists, we all have to adapt  and change to creating at home.

So you won’t be able to create your body swimming in water in exactly the same way that it has been made before.  And that really doesn’t matter. You will all be brilliantly creative artists at home!

So I am giving you  lots of CHOICE with how you create yourself swimming in water. I also want you to USE MORE THAN ONE ART MATERIAL OR WAY OF CREATING when you are making your rich task.

So perhaps you will draw with oil pastels

Grade 3 David Hockney style swimmer painting drawing 2

or watercolour pencils

or textas smudged with a wet  brush

or paint with a sponge

or paint with scrunched up newspaper 

will you use watercolour paint

or watered down food colouring

or use play doh

or make your own play doh or salt dough

Salt Dough Recipe

Ingredients

  • I cup salt
  • 2 cups plain flour
  • 1 cup hot water

Method

  1. Add salt and plain flour to a bowl gradually adding hot water. You might not need all the water!
  2. Mix together until a dough forms. Make sure it isn’t sticky.
  3. Leave your salt dough creations to air dry overnight. Then put your salt dough creations in the oven at 120 degrees Celsius for about 3 hours.
  4. When your salt dough creations are cool you can paint them. If you don’t have gloss paint and you want them to look shiny you can paint them with varnish when the paint is dry. If you don’t have any varnish just paint them with PVA glue. This will also make them nice and shiny.

or use a drawing or painting app on your ipad

or cut plain or patterned paper

or tear plain or patterned paper

or use scrap cardboard

or stuff out of the laundry basket

or other stuff

or some of those things

or all of those things

or something I haven’t even listed!

I am giving you lots and lots and lots of choice

in how you create your rich task

I am NOT telling you to go out and buy new art materials to use!

NO! NO! NO! NO! NO! NO! NO!

You need to THINK about what you already have at HOME and HOW you can use it.

 

Don’t forget to ask permission to pull stuff out of cupboards to use, or to make salt dough, or things like that.

And because this is a rich task you also need to

  • Label the body parts of yourself in Italian and English.

  • Find out what the word for water is in Italian.

  • Use digital technologies to enhance your work. You might use a creative app or take photos of your rich task as you create it or make a video explaining how you created your rich task, etc, etc.

· And, of course, tidy up after you have created!!!

I cannot wait to see your rich tasks inspired by David Hockney’s swimming paintings!

 

Here are two short videos for you to watch about David Hockney and his art.

In the first video the teacher talks about the artwork she wants her students to make. This is similar to the artwork Cambridge Primary School students have created in the past. You DO NOT have to create your Rich Task exactly in this way.

The second video shows some of David Hockney’s beautiful landscapes on show at The Royal Academy in London several years ago.

READ ALONG WITH MRS MENHENNET!

Your VISUAL ARTS TASK FOR WEEK 5 is to write a comment on my blog about the videos.

It is easy to write a comment on my blog. Don’t forget to use capital letters and full stops.

At the end of this blog post you will find a section titled,

LEAVE A COMMENT (or add a comment if nobody else has written one yet!)

Under that is a large box in which you type your comment. It looks like this. You can’t write in this one, Silly. You have to use the box at the bottom of this post.

After you have written your comment there is an anti spam box. The anti spam box is there to prove you are a real person not just a computer bot generating random comments. You need to copy the text from the anti spam box into the other box, just like in the photo below.

 

Then you type your name into the name box. Don’t forget to tell me which grade you are in.

In the next box you type your email address. If you don’t have an email address then you can ask someone from your family if you can use their email address.

Click on the little square at the bottom and you will get an email when I write the reply to your comment.

Finally click on the button that says POST COMMENT and you will have successfully written a comment.

Congratulations.

You have until the end of week 6 to upload your rich task,

Have fun,

Mrs Menhennet

July 29

GRADE 2 WEEK 4 TERM 3 REMOTE LEARNING 2020

GRADE 2 WEEK 4 TERM 3

REMOTE LEARNING 2020

3rd August 2020 – 7th August 2020

READ ALONG WITH MRS MENHENNET!

 

Hello to all my Grade 2 students from Cambridge Primary School and whoever else might be reading this post.

This is week 4 of Term 3 2020 and all my Grade 2 students are remote learning at home!

We are going to be doing a bit of Visual Arts learning about the English artist David Hockney and his paintings of water and swimming pools!

  • For students to explore the artworks of English artist David Hockney.

  • For students to experiment and explore drawing  their body moving in water.

  • To introduce the instructions for the Specialist Rich Task.

  • To revise the audio function on my blog post.

  • To read along with Mrs Menhennet as she reads the blog post aloud.

 

  • I can view and think about the artworks of David Hockney.

  • I can experiment and explore drawing my body moving in water.

  • I understand the instructions for the Specialist Rich Task.

  • I can play the audio function  on the blog post and read along with Mrs Menhennet.

Let’s get started!

In Week 2 I asked you to draw yourself swimming in water.

Grade 3 David Hockney style swimmer painting drawing 64

Last week (week 3) I asked you to draw yourself swimming in water again but I wanted you to try to improve on your drawing from week 2.

 

Grade 3 David Hockney style swimmer painting drawing 42

Some artists might have improved the way they drew hair moving in water or put bends in elbows or knees. I have made folders on your grade’s edmodo page for you to upload photos of your drawings for Week 2 and Week 3. These photos are evidence that you have completed this work.

Here are the Instructions for the Specialists Rich Task.

This Rich Task will require some thinking and some organising. You will need lots of time to complete it. So the Grade 2 Rich Task should be uploaded to your grade’s Edmodo folder by the end of WEEK 6!

For this Specialists Rich Task you will  –

CREATE YOURSELF SWIMMING IN WATER.

  • How does the water and the motion of swimming affect your body?

  • How does the water and motion of swimming affect your hair?

  • How will you create the water?

  • Label the body parts of yourself in Italian and English.

  • Find out what the word for water is in Italian.

  • Use digital technologies to enhance your work. You might use a creative app or take photos of your rich task as you create it or make a video explaining how you created your rich task, etc, etc.

  • What will you use to create this artwork?

For the last two weeks you might have used pencils or crayons or textas to PRACTICE drawing yourself swimming in water.

Now, in creating this Rich Task, you need to think about what else you might use to create yourself swimming in water.

thinking emoji

In the past, in the art room, my students have created themselves swimming in water like this.

Grade 3 David Hockney style swimmer painting drawing

Grade 3 David Hockney style swimmer painting drawing 1This artwork involved  –

  • Using colourful oil pastels to create their body swimming in water. Don’t forget your bathers!

  • Drawing their swimming body nice and large to fill the space on the paper. (If I wanted you to draw your swimming body really, really small I would tell you to create your art work on a tiny post it note!) DRAW BIG!

  • Using white oil pastel to draw wiggly lines in the water.

  • Using a blue wash of paint (blue paint or blue food dye with water in it) to paint over the white wiggly oil pastel lines.

  • Drawing or painting water is a challenge. The water is always moving. There are reflections in the water. The water moves and distorts the image of whatever is under the water. The water moves and distorts the image it is reflecting.

In this time of remote learning, as artists,  we are not working in the art room.

In this time of remote learning, as artists, we all have to adapt  and change to creating at home.

So you won’t be able to create your body swimming in water in exactly the same way that it has been made before.  And that really doesn’t matter. You will all be brilliantly creative artists at home!

So I am giving you  lots of CHOICE with how you create yourself swimming in water. I also want you to USE MORE THAN ONE ART MATERIAL OR WAY OF CREATING when you are making your rich task.

So perhaps you will draw with oil pastels

Grade 3 David Hockney style swimmer painting drawing 2

or watercolour pencils

or textas smudged with a wet  brush

or paint with a sponge

or paint with scrunched up newspaper 

will you use watercolour paint

or watered down food colouring

or use play doh

or make your own play doh or salt dough

Salt Dough Recipe

Ingredients

  • I cup salt
  • 2 cups plain flour
  • 1 cup hot water

Method

  1. Add salt and plain flour to a bowl gradually adding hot water. You might not need all the water!
  2. Mix together until a dough forms. Make sure it isn’t sticky.
  3. Leave your salt dough creations to air dry overnight. Then put your salt dough creations in the oven at 120 degrees Celsius for about 3 hours.
  4. When your salt dough creations are cool you can paint them. If you don’t have gloss paint and you want them to look shiny you can paint them with varnish when the paint is dry. If you don’t have any varnish just paint them with PVA glue. This will also make them nice and shiny.

or use a drawing or painting app on your ipad

or cut plain or patterned paper

or tear plain or patterned paper

or use scrap cardboard

or stuff out of the laundry basket

or other stuff

or some of those things

or all of those things

or something I haven’t even listed!

I am giving you lots and lots and lots of choice

in how you create your rich task

I am NOT telling you to go out and buy new art materials to use!

NO! NO! NO! NO! NO! NO! NO!

You need to THINK about what you already have at HOME and HOW you can use it.

 

Don’t forget to ask permission to pull stuff out of cupboards to use, or to make salt dough, or things like that.

And because this is a rich task you also need to

  • Label the body parts of yourself in Italian and English.

  • Find out what the word for water is in Italian.

  • Use digital technologies to enhance your work. You might use a creative app or take photos of your rich task as you create it or make a video explaining how you created your rich task, etc, etc.

· And, of course, tidy up after you have created!!!

I cannot wait to see your rich tasks inspired by David Hockney’s swimming paintings!

 

So for inspiration, before you get working, let’s look again at some of those paintings by David Hockney of swimming bodies in water.

 

All the swimmers in David Hockney’s paintings above have bent knees and bent arms. Bent knees and bent arms will help your body look like it is moving.

 

This is one of David Hockney’s Ipad drawings of a rainy night.

 

David Hockney was asked to design posters for the Olympic Games in Munich in 1972. This is his beautiful artwork called the Diver. Look how he painted the water and the diver’s reflection!

 

Did you know David Hockney was  asked to paint a real swimming pool?

 

 

It is a massive swimming pool at a big hotel in California, in the USA.

These are swimming bodies that have been created by Cambridge Primary School students as well as some swimming photos at the end of the blog post.

Grade 3 David Hockney style swimmer painting drawing 24Grade 3 David Hockney style swimmer painting drawing 23Grade 3 David Hockney style swimmer painting drawing 66Grade 3 David Hockney style swimmer painting drawing 21Grade 3 David Hockney style swimmer painting drawing 12Grade 3 David Hockney style swimmer painting drawing 11Grade 3 David Hockney style swimmer painting drawing 37Grade 3 David Hockney style swimmer painting drawing 35Grade 3 David Hockney style swimmer painting drawingGrade 3 David Hockney style swimmer painting drawing 4Grade 3 David Hockney style swimmer painting drawing 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You have until the end of week 6 to upload your rich task,

Have fun,

Mrs Menhennet

July 21

GRADE 2 WEEK 3 TERM 3 REMOTE LEARNING 2020

GRADE 2 WEEK 3 TERM 3

 REMOTE LEARNING 2020

(27th July  – 31st July)

READ ALONG WITH MRS MENHENNET!

Hello to all my Grade 2 students from Cambridge Primary School and whoever else might be reading this post.

This is week 3 of Term 3 2020 and all my Grade 2 students are remote learning at home!

 

We are going to be doing a bit of Visual Arts learning about the English artist David Hockney and his paintings of water and swimming pools!

  • For students to explore the artworks of English artist David Hockney.

  • For students to experiment and explore drawing  their body moving in water.

  • To revise the audio function on my blog post.

  • To read along with Mrs Menhennet as she reads the blog post aloud.

 

  • I can view and think about the artworks of David Hockney.

  • I can experiment and explore drawing my body moving in water.

  • I can play the audio function  on the blog post and read along with Mrs Menhennet.

Let’s get started!

Last week I asked you to draw yourself swimming in water.

Grade 3 David Hockney style swimmer painting drawing 64

I hope you kept last week’s drawing somewhere nice and safe. You will need to submit last week’s rainbow drawing as evidence of your completion of this unit of work when you submit your Specialists Rich Task.

 Instructions for the Specialists Rich Task will be forwarded to you soon.

We are going to be drawing soon so you will need some paper,

 

some pencils,

or crayons,

or textas.

Some people call textas, markers.

I am going to give you a little bit of time to organise yourself.

I will just sit here on my blog and wait for you to collect some pencils and textas or crayons and some paper.

The size of the paper or what sort of paper it is doesn’t really matter.

So I will just wait until you are ready……..

Oh, you are ready already! That was so fast! Well done!

Let’s look again at some of those paintings by David Hockney of swimming bodies in water.

All the swimmers in David Hockney’s paintings above have bent knees and bent arms. Bent knees and bent arms will help your body look like it is moving.

Now let’s look at this drawing.

Grade 3 David Hockney style swimmer painting drawing 54

This is a good first try at a drawing of a body swimming in water. I can see that the water is moving the hair around.

What could this artist do to improve their drawing the next time they draw a body swimming in water?

 

Yes, they could draw the head and the body in PROPORTION. The head in the coloured drawing below is too big for the body, like the swimmer above.

 

PROPORTION is a fantastic Visual Arts word that means when things in an artwork look the correct size, compared to each other, then they are in proportion.

What else could the artist change in their drawing of the swimming body to make their drawing look more mature?

Yes, the arms and legs are sticking out straight from the body. This body sort of looks like it is floating in the water. If the artist wants to make the body look like it is swimming they will need to put a bend in the knees and the elbows.

The artist above has put a bend in the arms but the drawing would look even better if the legs were bent at the knees as well. I really like how this artist has drawn the head turned to the side in the water.

If you think of the leg and the arm as looking more like a fat  capital letter L in the water then they will look more like they are swimming.

This artist has drawn a side view of the swimmer with lots of movement in the long hair in the water.  The left arm is curved but not bent. Bent arms and perhaps a bend in just one leg would look better.

Grade 3 David Hockney style swimmer painting drawing 25

This clever artist has drawn the swimmer with their face down in the water before they turn their head to breathe.This drawing makes me feel like I am a seagull flying and looking down at the swimmer in the ocean!

Grade 3 David Hockney style swimmer painting drawing 23

This swimmer has slightly curved legs and arms but bent   arms would have looked better. We can’t see all of the swimmer’s face as their head is slightly turned. The swimmer’s hair is moving in the water.

 

Grade 3 David Hockney style swimmer painting drawing 60

 

This artist has drawn themselves floating on their back, not swimming.

Grade 3 David Hockney style swimmer painting drawing 18

I can see a straight leg kicking action in the swimmer below. The view of the swimmer’s head is from the side. The curved arms would look better with a pointy elbow in each of them. The short hair is flattened on the head in the water.

 

Grade 3 David Hockney style swimmer painting drawing 42

 

So this week I would like you to have another go at drawing yourself swimming in water. Have a look at your drawing from last week and try to think of a couple of things you could do to improve your drawing this week.

You can use colour or just grey lead pencil as today we are still practising. It doesn’t really matter as long as your swimming body is nice and large on your paper.

You don’t need to submit your drawing this week.

 

 You will submit your drawings of your swimming body as evidence of your completion of this unit of work when you submit your Specialists Rich Task.

Have fun,

Mrs Menhennet

 

 

July 16

GRADE 2 WEEK 2 TERM 3 2020

GRADE 2 WEEK 2 TERM 3 2020

READ ALONG WITH MRS MENHENNET!

Press pause on the audio file whenever you need to stop.

Hello to all my Grade 2 students from Cambridge Primary School and whoever else might be reading this post.

hello word in block letters with exaggerated 3D shadows

This is week 2 of Term 3 2020 and all my Grade 2 students are at home!

This is not the way I usually work with Grade 2 students to teach them about Visual Arts but we will be doing this for a few weeks until it is safe to attend school again.

Until then, we will be learning like this – online – using my blog!

You will remember me from our time in the art room together last year.

Yes, it’s me – Mrs Menhennet! Most Cambridge Primary School students that know me, recognise me by my multicoloured hair!!!

Cambridge Primary School students always ask me, “Mrs Menhennet, how come you have all those colours in your hair?”

And I always tell them, “I don’t know. It just grew like that!”

 

We are going to be doing a bit of Visual Arts learning about the English artist David Hockney and his paintings of water and swimming pools!

  • For students to explore the artworks of English artist David Hockney.

  • For students to experiment and explore drawing  their body moving in water.

  • To introduce the audio function on my blog post.

  • To read along with Mrs Menhennet as she reads the blog post aloud.

 

  • I can view and think about the artworks of David Hockney.

  • I can experiment and explore drawing my body moving in water.

  • I can play the audio function  on the blog post and read along with Mrs Menhennet.

Let’s get started!

David Hockney is an artist who comes from Yorkshire in England in the United Kingdom.

This map shows where Yorkshire is in the United Kingdom.

This map of the world shows where the United kingdom is in relation to Australia.

He was born on the 9th July in 1937. So that means a couple of week’s ago he had his 83rd birthday!

That’s a lot of candles!

This is a photo of David Hockney sitting in a chair and two self portraits.

One of these is from 2003 when he was 67.

One is from 1954 when he was 17.

One is from 1970 when he was 33.

Can you figure out which one is which?

 

I’ll give you some thinking time to see if you can figure it out.

Yes, that’s right! The self portrait of him wearing the red scarf is from when he was 17. He first decided he wanted to be an artist when he was 11.

The photo of him in the chair, dressed so colourfully in a pink checked suit with bright red and green socks, is from when he was 33,

And the self portrait of him painting is from when he was 67.

Well done if you got those correct.

And now David Hockney is 83 years old and he is still painting and creating!

Way back in the 1960s, about 50 years ago, David Hockney travelled to the United States and flew into the airport in sunny California from cold and wintery England.

He was amazed at all the bright blue rectangles he could see out of the plane window as they were coming in to land.

What were those bright blue rectangles he could see?

Yes, swimming pools!

So David Hockney started painting pools, and people swimming, in the bright California sunshine.

This one is called, “A bigger splash”.

This painting always makes me feel like it is an extremely hot day.

The bright blue cloudless sky is almost shimmering in the heat.

 

The paving around the pool would feel hot under my feet and I would hop and skip my way around the pool knowing that the deep blue water would cool my feet down.

 

What is that yellowy rectangle jutting out over the water?

Yes, it is a diving board! What has just happened in this painting?

Someone has walked along the board, bounced a little on the end, and dived into the pool!

All we can see now is the splash flying up into the air.

We can’t see the swimmer at all, as they have already slithered and slipped away, under the surface of the cool blue water.

It’s almost like David Hockney was using his canvas as a photograph to capture that moment of the splash.

And that is what David Hockney discovered there on the side of the pool.

The splashes are always different.

 

The water is always moving.

Lines painted in the pool bend in the water.

There are shadows in the water.

Swimming bodies look different to standing or walking bodies.

 

And swimming bodies make strange, sometimes blurry shapes in the water.

So David Hockney started creating paintings of swimming pools and swimmers and water and nearly every time he painted the water it was different.

He wasn’t afraid to try new ways of doing things and experimented and tried new ways to paint water.

 

We are going to be drawing soon so you will need some paper,

 

some pencils,

or crayons,

or textas.

Some people call textas, markers.

I am going to give you a little bit of time to organise yourself.

I will just sit here on my blog and wait for you to collect some pencils and textas or crayons and some paper.

The size of the paper or what sort of paper it is doesn’t really matter.

So I will just wait until you are ready……..

Oh, you are ready already! That was so fast! Well done!

Let’s look at this painting again.

This painting is called, “Pool with two figures.”

The man on the side of the pool is looking down at the swimmer. I wonder what he is thinking?

His body is positioned very differently to the swimmer. his arms are flat by his sides.

His back is straight. His neck is bent, his eyes looking down at the water.

Even though we can’t see his eyes we know that is what he is doing.

Now let’s look at the swimmer. Is his body standing straight with arms at the sides?

No! His arms are stretching out in front of his head.

I think he is reaching for the end of the pool. Soon he will feel the smooth tiles under his fingers and he will know he is there.

Will he pull his head up out of the water and look at his friend standing there?


Or will he do a quick flip and tumble over in the water to swim back the other way? Will he surprise his friend standing there watching, and splash him?

I want you to draw a picture of yourself swimming in water but

this is GRADE 2 so I want you using your brain and thinking  hard before you start!

Close your eyes.

Yes, I said close your eyes.

I want you to think…… close your eyes!

.

I want you to think about….. Close your eyes!!!

My SUPER ART TEACHER POWERS are telling me you are peeking and I want you to get drawing, so close your eyes!

I want you to stand nice and tall and straight like the man on the side of the pool.

Are you standing? Arms down by your side and your head slightly bent.

I have just used my SUPER ART TEACHER POWERS and you are now moving in SLOW MOTION.

 

Your head is still bent forward and you start to slowly bend your whole body forward, slowly, slowly and topple into the pool with all your clothes on!

How do you feel?

Get your head up out of the water so you can breathe!

You are no longer moving in slow motion but you are very relaxed  and floating in the water. How do your arms and legs move when you are just floating in the water?

They just sort of blob along with the movement of the water, don’t they? It’s very relaxing as this pool water is warm. So it is a bit like blobbing along in a gigantic warm bath.

Now slowly and gently get yourself into a swimming position. Off you go, swimming in the wonderfully soothing warm water.

What are your arms doing?

How are your legs moving?

How does the water affect your hair? Does your hair move in the water?

You can open your eyes now!

Now you are ready to DRAW!

I want you to draw yourself floating in water.

Sometimes, when my students start drawing they start with a teeny tiny drawing because they are not too sure about what they are doing.

 I don’t want you to draw a teeny tiny picture of yourself. The drawing of the body below is way too small.

Grade 3 David Hockney style swimmer painting drawing 64

 

I want you to draw a great BIG picture of yourself floating in water on whatever sized paper you have!

Grade 3 David Hockney style swimmer painting drawing 61

So, let’s practice using your magic finger.

Hold up your magic finger!

Wave it around in the air!

Make sure it is switched on!

Let’s test it out. Draw a small circle in the air.

Draw a large square in the air.

Write your name in the air.

Write your name 3 times really fast in the air!

Oh, you are faster than me as my name is soooooo looooong!

Now put your magic finger in the air and draw your body.

Okay, so now we know it is working use your magic finger to draw a very small picture of yourself on your paper. Your magic finger is fantastic to practice drawing with as it draws invisibly and you never have to rub it out!

Now draw yourself floating in water  a little bit bigger with your magic finger on your paper.

Now draw yourself really big on your paper with your magic finger.

By practising with your magic finger I hope you will end up drawing yourself nice and large on your paper.

 

You can use lots of colour if you like but even if you just use a pencil for this drawing that will be fine. This is just practice so please don’t be too critical of yourself if you don’t think it is perfect. Please keep your drawing so we can look at it again next week.

Have fun,

Mrs Menhennet

Grade 2 Week 2 2020 Swimming in water first drawing.

May 15

HEIDE AT HOME CLAY CHALLENGE MAY 2020

The Heide Museum of Modern Art in Heidelberg, Victoria is currently running a clay challenge.

You need to use clay,

grade 1 clay 65

grade 1 clay 65

or plasticine, or playdoh and make an artwork inspired by one of the clay pieces from the Heide Collection.

John Perceval bowl with handle 1948

You photograph your work and then email it to Heide.

 

Merric Boyd bowl 1950

 

The link below will take you to the page on their website which has photos of their claywork to inspire you.

https://www.heide.com.au/heide-home-clay-challenge

 

John Perceval goblets

There is a category for under 18 claywork entries and over 18 claywork entries.

 

Melindas Harper stoneware vessel 2007

I think the challenge only goes until the end of May so you will have to check the details for dates on their website.

 

Stephen Benwell vase 1991

 

Good luck with your entry!

 

melinda Hrper ceramic 6 2005

 

Mirka Mora untitled plate 1967

 

August 20

BUT WHAT ABOUT CLAY???

grade 1 clay 29

It has come to my attention that lots of Visual Arts programs/classrooms don’t seem to be doing clay anymore!

grade 1 clay

grade 1 clay 57

I have developed this opinion after discussing it, off the cuff, at school, at network meetings, at our Outer West Visual Art Teachers Network Professional Learning Day, earlier this year, talking to colleagues at last year’s Art Education Victoria Conference, etc, etc, etc.

grade 1 clay 53

grade 1 clay 53

And, as far as I am aware, modelling is still a part of the Visual Arts Curriculum in Victoria.

grade 1 clay 54

grade 1 clay 54

I use clay for most of my modelling sessions. It’s fun. It’s messy! It’s cheap! And my students love it! And I love it!

grade 1 clay 65

grade 1 clay 65

And, let’s face it, the Visual Arts room is the last place in the school where you are not only allowed, but encouraged, to make a mess, while you express yourself!

clay man in boat

grade 1 clay 32

So what is happening out there? Are you still doing clay at your school? Have you got a kiln that is no longer being used? Why not? Do you find it too messy? Seriously? Or is all the kiln firing too time consuming? is it an OH&S matter at your school? Why? Do you use alternative materials to clay for modelling or is it just not part of your Visual Arts curriculum any more???? Do you find it a bit scary – a bit out of your comfort zone? Would it be helpful if more networks or other bodies were offering more professional learning in this area?

grade 1 clay face 22

grade 1 clay face 22

Please reply and comment on my observation as I would really like to know what you think.

Shell

PS I have mentioned this to my students and they have been as horrified as I am that there are other students out there who seem to be missing out on such a wonderful material to learn and have fun with in the art room.

grade 1 clay face 27

grade 1 clay face 27

August 16

FIELD OF PAPER POPPIES APRIL 2015

field of paper poppies April 2015 Georgia

April 25th 2015 was the 100th anniversary of ANZAC Day.

paper poppies field April 2015 2

paper poppies field April 2015 2

I am part of the Special Weeks committee, which organizes all sorts of Special Events as part of the school calendar, at Cambridge Primary School, and we thought that as a whole school we had to do something to commemorate the 100th ANZAC day!

paper poppies field April 2015 16

paper poppies field April 2015 16

So we came up with the very simple idea of each student and staff member making a paper poppy and planting it into the ground to create a field of poppies.

paper poppies field April 2015

paper poppies field April 2015

Each grade was supplied with enough wooden skewers for one for each child but after that it was up to the teachers how they put their poppies together. There were no other rules or instructions to follow as we really didn’t want them to look all exactly the same.

paper poppies field April 2015 3

paper poppies field April 2015 3

paper poppies field April 2015 20 They just all had to be planted by lunch time on the Friday before ANZAC day, in a rather bare patch of ground, near the office, at the front of the school.

paper poppies field April 2015 19

paper poppies field April 2015 19

I started the planting process off in the morning and then was running back and forth from the main art room during the day to take photos as the planting progressed. It was lovely to lift my head up from my work in the main art room and catch a glimpse of all the heads down and bottoms up action as the students and staff planted their poppies and then stood around admiring their work and the work of others. There was even quite a reverent, emotional atmosphere around the poppy field.

paper poppies field April 2015 17

paper poppies field April 2015 17

I did find I had to stand guard when I was on yard duty at snack time though as several Prep children thought it would be a great idea to run through and stomp on all the poppies – so much for being reverent, emotional and caught up in the atmosphere, when you are 5! paper poppies field April 2015 13

My battery died on my Ipad, of course, so I didn’t even get to photograph the complete field of poppies.

paper poppies field April 2015 12

paper poppies field April 2015 12

The photographer arrived from the local paper and took a lovely photo which luckily included my Georgie.(Yay! XXX) I think that is the only local newspaper photo Georgia has ever been in for her school so it was nice she got to be in one during her final year at Cambridge PS! As this photographer was there rather early in the day I don’t think he even saw the whole field of poppies.

field of paper poppies April 2015 Georgia

field of paper poppies April 2015 Georgia

A Bright ANZAC tribute at Cambridge Primary School. “The gardens of Cambridge Primary School were a sea of red last Friday as the school marked Anzac Day. The Hoppers Crossing school wanted to mark the 100th anniversary of the landing at Gallipoli with something special, so it created a field of poppies. Assistant principal Nella Cascone said the school’s 935 pupils and 90 staff made the flowers. A planting ceremony was then held last Friday afternoon, giving everyone a chance to pay their respects. Grade 6 pupils Georgia, Ayaan and Shaubing (pictured) were among the children who helped plant the poppies.” – See more at: http://www.starweekly.com.au/news/1836763-poppies-a-bright-anzac-tribute-at-cambridge-primary-school/#sthash.a5wHAjMi.dpuf

paper poppies field April 2015 11

paper poppies field April 2015 11

At the end of the school day there was quite a crowd as plenty of families photographed and admired the poppy field, with all commenting about how it had been a fantastic idea, and some being very moved by it.

paper poppies field April 2015 8

paper poppies field April 2015 8

Susie, my Science teacher colleague, and I, waited until 4.00pm to make our sad, regretful decision. The weather was changing rather drastically, with the wind becoming quite ferocious and a heavy storm predicted for the early evening. We had intended leaving the poppies in the field and collecting them up on Monday morning but the thought of arriving at school to find the poppies shredded by the storm and dumped all over the school yard was just devastating. So regretfully, Susie, Georgie and I, and a few helpers from After School Care, packed up the magnificent field of poppies into boxes before the storm could destroy them.

paper poppies field April 2015 4

paper poppies field April 2015 4

‘They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old;

Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.

At the going down of the sun and in the morning

We will remember them.’

paper poppies field April 2015 10

paper poppies field April 2015 10

paper poppies field April 2015 9

paper poppies field April 2015 9

paper poppies field April 2015 6

paper poppies field April 2015 6

Thanks for reading,

Shell